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Redwoods Rising

Redwood Spooks!

This beetle dines on snails and slugs, stalking them on the forest floor. It uses its elongated head to reach deep inside snail shells. While it does not consider humans its prey, it can deliver a noticeable pinch and will repeatedly click when disturbed. 

Strawberries and Cream Mushroom 

In the spirit of Halloween, here are some of the most creepy, crawly, and spooky inhabitants of Redwood National and State Parks!  What creature makes your skin crawl the most? Carabid BeetleThis beetle dines on snails and slugs, stalking them on the forest floor. It uses its elongated head to reach deep inside snail shells. While it does not consider humans its prey, it can deliver a noticeable pinch and will repeatedly click when disturbed. Strawberries and Cream Mushroom This Hydnellum species “bleeds” when wet, earning the sinister nickname of “bleeding tooth” or the more sweet tooth-themed nickname of “strawberries and cream.”Dampwood TermitesThese winged termites, called alates, take flight and pair up to start a new colony–only after they rip off their wings! While the presence of termites would be a frightful sight to any tree, but especially one that lives for 2,000+ years, these termites only feed on rotten wood. A mature redwood does have enough tannin in its bark and heartwood to stop an infestation of termites. California Beach FleasCalifornia beach fleas are not the blood sucking type, but instead hop all over the beach at the high tide line, consuming decaying plant and animal matter that washes up. While the sight of them might make you think twice about sitting in the sand, they play an important role in keeping the beaches clean. Rough-skinned NewtA small fellow, this newt can pack enough neurotoxin to poison up to 14 people. This chemical defense is due in large part to the coast gartersnake, whose population can build up an immunity to this neurotoxin. 

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Redwoods Rising

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8 international foresters recently visited and shared their know-how with us. Fun times for all and we recommend making friends under 300 foot trees !https://www.facebook.com/NPSInternationalAffairs/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

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RedwoodNPS

Redwoods in Winter

Winter in the redwoods means rain, winds, and high surf. Unlike their giant sequoia cousins, redwoods are not acclimated to snow and freezing temperatures. R...

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Redwoods Rising

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There’s a lot of climate change science being talked about at national parks across the country. So what’s happening where the coastal redwoods live?http://www.triplicate.com/news/4856941-151/climate-change-what-can-parks-expect

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RedwoodNPS

Redwood Prescribed Fire - Behind the Scenes (Episode 5)

21 Days Later. Three weeks after the burn we return to look at how the landscape is recovering. Final episode in this series.

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